Welcome to the new eLessons Learned

eDiscovery Written by Law Students

eDiscovery Written by Law Students

eLessons Learned features insightful content authored primarily by law students from throughout the country. The posts are written to appeal to a broad spectrum of readers, including those with little eDiscovery knowledge.

Law + Technology + Human Error

Law + Technology + Human Error

Each blog post: (a) identifies cases that address technology mishaps; (b) exposes the specific conduct that caused a problem; (c) explains how and why the conduct was improper; and (d) offers suggestions on how to learn from these mistakes and prevent similar ones from reoccurring.

New to the eDiscovery world?

New to the eDiscovery world?

Visit our signature feature, e-Discovery Origins: Zubulake, designed to give readers a primer on the e-discovery movement through blog posts about the Zubulake series of court opinions which helped form the foundation for e-discovery. Go There

Contribute to eLessons Learned

Contribute to eLessons Learned

Interested students may apply for the opportunity to write for e-Lessons Learned by filling out the simple application. Go There

eDiscovery Etiquette: Who Should Pick Up the Check?

Electronic Discovery requests can pose substantial financial burdens for the parties to a lawsuit.  According to the New York County Supreme Court, these costs are the responsibility of the party who is required to produce the e-discovery.  However, there are a few exceptions to this general rule, including discovery requests that present an undue burden to the producing party and situations in which the requesting party has already agreed to pay the costs of production.

Continue Reading

Twitter Turnover: If you tweet in the woods, and no one hears it, does it make a sound?

If you tweet, it’s the same as though you screamed your message out of the window. On October 11, 2011, the defendant in this case was charged with Disorderly Conduct for allegedly marching on the Brooklyn Bridge.  In connection with the Disorderly Conduct charge, New York sent a subpoena to Twitter in order to see the defendant’s account information and tweets, asserting they are relevant to an ongoing criminal investigation.

Continue Reading

When Parties Fail to Cooperate During Discovery, Everybody Loses

It's no secret that courts prefer settlements over protracted litigation. Because the court system encounters an incredibly heavy case load, parties are heavily encouraged to resolve disputes amongst themselves. This is especially true for discovery disputes. Parties are expected to deal with any hiccups in the discovery process through negotiation and discussion between each other, with little court intervention.

Continue Reading

Intra-Office E-mails: What Used To Be Unreported Office Gossip Now Potentially Exposes Companies to Liability

Serious problems can arise when what used to be office gossip around the water cooler instead manifests in discoverable intra office e-mails.

Continue Reading

Bold Failures to Hold Can Leave Your Evidence out in the Cold

Take caution not to destroy documentation when litigation is on the horizon!  When litigation is reasonably anticipated, the parties have an affirmative obligation to ensure that documentation is not negligently or willfully destroyed.  Failing to retain relevant documentation can lead to the preclusion of evidence necessary to make your case, as it did in Hameroff & Son, LLC.v. Plank, LLC.

Continue Reading

Failure to Reasonably Inquire About the Completeness of Your Discovery Can Cost You

A lawsuit over  a policy charging plane passengers for their checked luggage has put lawyers across the country on notice as to what constitutes a “reasonably inquiry” when it comes to complying with discovery obligations.  And the lesson cost Delta and AirTran a lot more than a $15 checked-luggage fee.

Continue Reading

Failure to Execute a Litigation Hold Can Leave Attorneys and Their Clients Vulnerable

An attorney has a duty to preserve discovery prior to pending litigation. Failing to properly execute a litigation hold can lead to a plethora of other issues. Most importantly, failure can leave attorneys and their clients vulnerable.

Continue Reading

Honesty is the Best Policy, and Cell Phone Upgrades Are Not An Excuse

Don’t knowingly produce incorrect electronic devices for discovery! When opposing counsel requests production of your client’s cell phone from the relevant time period for inspection, it is your duty to provide accurate information regarding the whereabouts of the phone. 

Continue Reading

Is It Safe to Delete Your Groupon E-mails?

Often, when entering one’s e-mail account, a person will encounter a plethora of advertisements, chain e-mails, spam, and other irrelevant junk mail. Pursuant to their daily habit, one sifts through their mailbox in an effort to delete any hourly Groupon deals or invitations to join new dating websites, in order to find the e-mails important to their career, education, etc. However, when does a routine deletion of spam constitute a legal violation? For the average lay worker, without clear advice of legal counsel, it is difficult to discern which deletions will come back to bite you in the end during litigation.  In a 2010 case, a discrimination lawsuit exposed how a seemingly harmless deletion to clean an inbox could have resulted in a legal sanction.

Continue Reading

Just When You Thought AOL Was Irrelevant—It’s Good to Know those Emails from 1999 Won’t be Getting Out

Contrary to popular belief, AOL is still an internet service provider and has recently made itself relevant again.  During the Hurricane Katrina litigation in McIntosh v. State Farm Fire & Casualty Co., two non-party witnesses discovered what they believed to be fraud on behalf of State Farm.

Continue Reading